Click anywhere on the interface to jump to a control’s definition.

In the 1980’s, new machines started appearing in the world: black boxes with only a few buttons and lists of incomprehensible presets. But when musicians and producers got their hands on these early digital effect units, new sounds started appearing in the world, too: gritty, digitized, and unrealistic reverbs that transformed the music of the day, creating signature sonic textures. Suddenly a snare could blossom, for a moment, in a vast, digital hall before — wham! — nothing at all: dead silence. (The classic gated snare.) Or a guitar could fill a small room before dissolving in a long tail of crackling analog noise and digital hiss. Or a synthesizer could surround itself with a dark ambience. These days many think of these as “bad” sounds, limited by those primitive digital reverb units. But here at Goodhertz — where we often look to prove that what is “bad” is, in reality, beautiful — we have brought that sound back to life, and better than ever.

Meet Megaverb — an incredibly good, “bad” digital reverb plugin. On the one hand, it is a recreation that captures that iconic sound of the 1980’s. On the other, it is a modern piece of precision engineering that pushes that sound further, opening up your music to a world of sounds that those early digital reverbs could not imagine or implement.

So whether you’re after that classic gated snare, or that dissolving guitar, or that menacing synth, Megaverb’s presets have you covered.

We’ve also made it easy to use. Unlike the arcane controls of many 1980’s reverb units, Megaverb has a simple, expressive interface that gets out of your way so you can quickly dial in the sound you’re looking for. And (as always with Goodhertz plugins), Megaverb’s controls can handle anything you throw at them. Automate a reverb throw with the Wet Gain slider, create an infinite reverb loop by ramping the Verb Decay, or sweep the filters in realtime. Anything you can think of, Megaverb can handle seamlessly — no clicks, no pops, just the sound of your music, modified.

Need more precise control when searching for your perfect gated reverb sound? Tweak the detection mode or invert the classic 80’s gated reverb into a never-before-heard ducked reverb in the advanced Gate + section.

We hope you have fun time-traveling to the past and future with Megaverb!

Controls

Primary Controls

Master Mix

Controls Megaverb’s overall wet/dry mix.

At 0% the output will be dry (direct) signal only, while at 100% the output will be wet (reverb) signal only. At 50% the output will be an equal mix of wet and dry.

The Master Mix does not affect the operation of Megaverb’s gate, and even at a MasterMix of 0%, the gating can still affect the dry signal (if you have chosen a Dry Gate Target).

If you’d like to “lock” the Master Mix while changing presets, just right-click anywhere on the control and choose the “Lock Master Mix When Switching Presets” option. When the control is locked, a lock icon will appear in the upper left corner.

How should I set the Master Mix when using Megaverb with an auxiliary send?
Usually 100%.

Why should I use Megaverb with an auxiliary send?
Depending on what you’re trying to achieve, it often makes sense to put reverbs on a dedicated aux track, allowing you to send multiple sources to a single reverb instance. Some potential advantages are:

  • Lower CPU usage. Instead of having an instance of Megaverb for each background vocal, you can achieve the same effect with only one!
  • Mix cohesion. Using reverb aux sends helps promote mix cohesion, allowing you to use the same reverb on multiple sources for a more unified sound.
  • Retain source panning. Unlike an insert, which is generally pre-panning, aux sends can be post-panning, preserving the stereo placement of the source in the reverb.
  • More control. Putting reverbs on a dedicated aux allows you to add other plugins or processing to the reverb signal.
  • Min 0%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 50%

Reverb

Megaverb has an interactive sketch showing the overall shape of the reverb’s impulse response, its early reflections, and how it interacts with the Gate.

Reverb SketchReverb Sketch

Verb Decay

Controls how long it takes for the reverb to decay.

Verb Decay sets the approximate RT60 time for Megaverb’s decay (the RT60 is defined as the time it takes for the reverb to decay 60 dB from its peak level).

Here are some common RT60 times for reference:

SpaceRT60
Room0.5 - 2 sec
Concert Hall1.5 - 4 sec
Church / Cathedral2 - 15 sec
  • Min 0.5s
  • Max 25s
  • Default 4s

Predelay Verb Predelay

Controls the amount of time before the reverb onset begins.

  • At 0 ms, the reverb begins immediately, with no gap in time between the dry signal and the start of the wet (reverb) signal.
  • At longer Verb Predelay settings, like 50 ms, there will be a short gap in time between the dry signal and the start of the wet (reverb) signal.
  • At even longer Verb Predelay settings above around 100 ms, there will be a very obvious audible gap — like a slapback delay — between the dry signal and the start of the wet (reverb) signal.

If you change the predelay quickly, you may hear some pitch modulation. Don’t be alarmed; this effect is similar to the Doppler effect you hear as a fast-moving object passes you (like a car honking its horn).

Why would I want this control?
Great question! Verb Predelay gives you more precise control over how the reverb and direct sound interact: when there’s no predelay, the reverb is fused with the direct sound, creating a single, cohesive image. When there’s more predelay, the direct sound stands apart from the reverb, increasing the direct sound’s clarity and focus.

For example, if you’re mixing a lead vocal with Megaverb and you want more focus on the lead, try using a Verb Predelay setting of 15 to 30 ms.

  • Min 0ms
  • Max 500ms
  • Default 15ms

Predelay Verb Predelay Note

Like Verb Predelay, but in musical note lengths (quarter note, eighth note, etc) synced to the DAW’s project tempo.

This control does not appear in the default configuration of Megaverb, and must be enabled by the Verb Predelay Sync control, immediately to the left of Verb Predelay.

Megaverb has an internal predelay limit of a half note at 60BPM. If your tempo is below 60BPM, a bar will appear on the control to cover invalid note lengths.

Predelay LimitPredelay Limit

  • Min 0
  • Max 1/2
  • Default 0

Verb Predelay Sync

When set to values other than TIME, this control enables the Verb Predelay Note control, meaning Predelay will be synced to fractional units of the current project tempo.

ModeDescription
TIMESeconds
NOTETempo-synced
DOTTempo-synced, dotted note values
TRIPTempo-synced, triplet note values

Damping Verb Damping

Controls the timbre of the reverb as it decays.

At 100%, the reverb decay gets darker over time for a more muffled sound with less high frequency content (e.g. a heavily carpeted room).

At -100%, the reverb decay gets brighter over time for a thinner sound with more high frequency content.

When focused on Verb Damping, the sidebar illustration will show the frequency response of the decay filter.

  • Min -100%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 0%

Mode Verb Mode

Selects the reverb algorithm. Each algorithm has its own distinct character and style:

ModeDescription
AQuick, resonant (ex. Phil Collins - Sussudio)
BWeird, nonlinear (ex. David Bowie - Let’s Dance)
CSmooth, big (ex. Whitney Houston - I Wanna Dance With Somebody)
DEven bigger (ex. Aphex Twin - Polynomial C)

In general, the Verb Mode’s go in order from smallest to largest, where A has the least amount of buildup in the early reflections, and D has the longest buildup in the early reflections. That said, that doesn’t mean you can’t use A with a long Verb Decay or D with a short Verb Decay. Follow your ears!

Filter

The Filter section allows you to shape the frequency content of the reverb signal directly with high/low cut filters.

Filter Range Low

Controls the cutoff frequency of the reverb’s low cut filter.

When Filter Range Low is set to Off, no low cut filter is applied.

Check the sidebar to see the frequency response of the filter when you focus on Filter Range Low or Filter Range High.

  • Min 20Hz
  • Max 6000Hz
  • Default 100Hz

Filter Range High

Controls the cutoff frequency of the reverb’s high cut filter.

When Filter Range High is set to Off, no high cut filter is applied.

Check the sidebar to see the frequency response of the filter when you focus on Filter Range Low or Filter Range High.

  • Min 40Hz
  • Max 12000Hz
  • Default 2900Hz

Lofi

A big part of the sound of early digital reverbs came from their lack of digital resolution and their lofi digital converters. We’ve modeled these characteristics in Megaverb and have split them into digital & analog controls that can be dialed in separately: Lofi Amount Analog & Lofi Amount Digital.

Lofi On/Off

Turns the lofi section on/off.

  • Min Off
  • Max On

Analog Lofi Amount Analog

Controls the amount of analog clipping applied to the reverb signal.

Increasing Lofi Amount Analog will cause more audible analog-style clipping, similar in sound to a hard-clipped transistor.

  • Min 0%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 25%

Digital Lofi Amount Digital

Controls the amount of digital degradation applied to the reverb signal.

Increasing Lofi Amount Digital will decrease the bit depth and headroom available to the reverb, creating a grittier, gnarlier sound. In the extreme settings, the reverb will become very noisy and very distorted.

A setting of 20% corresponds to approximately 12 bits of internal resolution for the reverb.

  • Min 0%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 25%

Gate

Gated reverb is a quintessentially 80’s sound, and Megaverb makes achieving that sound easy: just turn on the gate and trigger it with something transient (you can also trigger Megaverb’s gate with the built-in sidechain if desired). But Megaverb doesn’t stop there! — we’ve also added a ton of other gating and ducking options that make it possible to achieve highly dynamic, adaptive reverb sounds and other interesting gating effects. See the Advanced Gate + controls for more information on how the advanced controls work and what you can do with them.

Gate On/Off

Turns the gate on/off.

  • Min Off
  • Max On

Time Gate Time

Controls how long the gate will stay open each time it is triggered.

For more control of the gate timing, see Gate Attack Time & Gate Release Time in the Advanced section.

  • Min 1ms
  • Max 2000ms
  • Default 100ms

Gate Time Note

Like Gate Time, but in musical note lengths synced to the DAW’s project tempo.

This control does not appear in the default configuration of Megaverb, and must be enabled by the Gate Time Sync control, immediately below Gate Time.

  • Min 1/64
  • Max 1
  • Default 1/16

Gate Time Sync

When set to values other than TIME, this control enables the Gate Time Note control, meaning Predelay will be synced to fractional units of the current project tempo.

ModeDescription
TIMESeconds
NOTETempo-synced
DOTTempo-synced, dotted note values
TRIPTempo-synced, triplets note values

Advanced Controls

The Advanced section offers more precise control and fine adjustment options.

To access Megaverb’s advanced controls, click the ••• icon in the sidebar.

Gain +

Though they fundamentally do the same thing, the Advanced Gain controls provide an extra layer of control of the wet/dry gains beyond what the Master Mix control can do. In particular, they make it possible to automate the wet/dry gain after you’ve already found a global mix setting that you like. Dramatic effects like reverb throws and quick reverb cuts can be achieved without requiring the use of an aux send.

Dry Gain

Controls the gain of the dry (direct) signal.

  • Min -96dB
  • Max 12dB
  • Default 0dB

Wet Gain

Controls the gain of the wet (reverb) signal.

  • Min -96dB
  • Max 12dB
  • Default 0dB

Stereo +

Stereo Crosstalk

Adjusts the amount of stereo, left-right crosstalk pre-reverb.

The Stereo Crosstalk controls how much stereo information is fed into the reverb algorithm before the actual reverb processing happens. At 0%, no crosstalk occurs and the left & right channels are fed into the reverb as-is. At 100%, the left & right channels are completely blended together, and the signal that feeds the reverb will be mono. At 50%, the left & right channels are partially blended together, and the resulting reverb will have a mix of left & right in both output channels while retaining some of the original stereo information.

I can’t hear what this control is doing — what gives?
Because this control affects the signal before it hits the reverb, depending on your source material, you may or may not be able to tell exactly what it’s doing. However, the Stereo Crosstalk has a big effect on hard-panned material. For example, imagine we have a source, a guitar, that’s hard-panned to the left. That means that when we listen to the dry guitar, it only comes out of the left speaker. If we send that hard-panned guitar to Megaverb, we might want the reverb to also be hard-panned, or just partially panned, or not panned at all. That’s what the Stereo Crosstalk control allows you to choose. At 0%, the guitar’s reverb will also be hard-panned to the left, creating an isolated, somewhat unnatural stereo image. At 100%, however, the guitar reverb will be balanced in the left/right channels creating a more natural, all-encompassing reverb sound. When you want a wider, all-over reverb sound, try using more Stereo Crosstalk. Conversely, if you want more distinct reverb with a clearer stereo field, try using less Stereo Crosstalk.

  • Min 0%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 50%

Stereo Bias

Controls the stereo bias of the reverb’s early reflections.

At a Stereo Bias setting of 0%, the reverb’s early reflections will arrive at approximately the same time for the left & right channels. At a Stereo Bias setting of 100%, the reverb’s early reflections will arrive slightly earlier for the right channel, making the reverb sound slightly right-sided. At a Stereo Bias setting of -100%, the reverb’s early reflections will arrive slightly earlier for the left channel, making the reverb sound slightly left-sided. Generally, the further away from 0%, the wider the reverb sounds.

  • Min -100%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 0%

Stereo Width Bass

Adjusts the stereo width of the bass frequencies post-reverb.

For a totally mono low end, set Stereo Width Bass to 0%.

Want to make the entire reverb mono? Set both Stereo Width Bass and Stereo Width Treble to 0%.

  • Min 0%
  • Max 200%
  • Default 100%

Stereo Width Treble

Adjusts the stereo width of the treble frequencies post-reverb.

Try out 200% for super wide, expansive highs. Conversely, at 0% the reverb will be completely mono for higher frequencies.

  • Min 0%
  • Max 200%
  • Default 100%

Gate +

Fine tune Megaverb’s Gate with these advanced controls! Get exactly the envelope you want by combining Gate Time, Gate Attack Time, and Gate Release Time.

Gate Mode: 25ms Attack, 100ms Gate Time, and 25ms ReleaseGate Mode: 25ms Attack, 100ms Gate Time, and 25ms Release
Duck Mode: 25ms Attack, 100ms Gate Time, and 25ms ReleaseDuck Mode: 25ms Attack, 100ms Gate Time, and 25ms Release

Gate Mode

Controls how the gate operates: either as a gate (when triggered, sound is let through) or as a ducker (when triggered, sound is muted).

Gate Sensitivity

Controls how easily the gate can be triggered to open.

At 0%, only the most extreme transients/peaks will open the gate. At 100%, the gate will be extremely responsive.

The Gate Sensitivity control has some handy metering that shows the activity of the Gate Sidechain Source signal in realtime. The triangle (▼) indicator points to the minimum Gate Sensitivity setting where the gate would be triggered.

Gate Sensitivity MeterGate Sensitivity Meter

  • Min 0%
  • Max 100%
  • Default 50%

Gate Attack Time

Sets the amount of time it takes for the Gate to ramp up once it has been triggered.

Gate Attack Time controls the slew rate of the gate when opening: that is, how quickly it can change from closed to open.

Try a short Gate Attack Time if you want sharp, percussive gating. For a softer, smoothed attack, try a longer Gate Attack Time.

  • Min 0ms
  • Max 2000ms
  • Default 2ms

Gate Release Time

Sets the amount of time it takes for the Gate to ramp down while closing.

Gate Release Time controls the slew rate of the gate when closing: that is, how quickly it can change from open to closed.

Try a short Gate Release Time for a very abrupt, chopped reverb decay. Alternatively, if you’d like a smoother sounding gate release, try a longer Gate Release Time, like 1000 ms.

  • Min 0ms
  • Max 2000ms
  • Default 25ms

Gate Range

Controls how much the gate can turn down the target signal.

The Gate Range operation depends on how Gate Mode is set:

Gate Mode
At Inf, the gate will completely mute the signal when not being triggered. At 6 dB, the gate will turn down the signal 6 dB when not being triggered.

Duck Mode
At Inf, the gate will completely mute the signal when it is triggered. At 6 dB, the gate will turn down the signal 6 dB when it is triggered.

For more dramatic, obvious gating or ducking, use higher values like Inf. For more understated gating, use lower values like 6 dB.

  • Min 0dB
  • Max 72dB
  • Default 72dB

Gate Detection

Selects which algorithm is used for detecting when the gate should open/close.

Transient: As the name suggests, this algorithm is best suited for transient material and is highly responsive. The transient mode can be used to achieve extremely fast, accurate gating. Because it reacts to relative changes in the input signal, it behaves the same way for loud inputs as it does for quiet inputs — no need to set a threshold! For example, if you have a snare triggering the gate, it doesn’t matter how loud the snare is, the gate will trigger equally well if there are quiet and loud passages. One other characteristic of the transient algorithm that’s worth mentioning is that, in many cases, the gate will stay open for exactly the time set by the Gate Time, which can be very useful in rhythmic contexts.

Classic: The classic detection mode is, as you might guess, a more traditional, level-based detection algorithm. The Gate Sensitivity control sets how sensitive the gate is and the level required for it to turn on. Unlike the transient mode, this mode is best for sustained sounds and material that does not have clear transients.

Dynamic: The dynamic detection mode was designed to follow the dynamics of the Gate Sidechain Source, resulting in a smoother, less sharp gating sound. It’s useful for more subtle gating & ducking effects where the contrast between “on” and “off” becomes somewhat blurred. It can also be useful for signals that do not have consistent transients or peak levels, which would otherwise be difficult to gate with the Transient or Classic modes. We recommend using Dynamic detection with things like vocals and synth pads.

Gate Target

Controls what will be gated.

TargetBehavior
WetThe wet reverb signal is gated
Wet PreThe wet signal is gated before it hits the reverb
DryThe dry signal is gated
Dry + WetBoth wet & dry are gated
Dry + Wet PreBoth wet & dry are gated. The wet signal is gated before it hits the reverb

The Gate Target selection has a big impact on the type of gating effect that will be heard. The most obvious effects usually involve the Wet Gate Target, where the reverb’s decay can be abruptly chopped by the gate (ex. the standard 80’s gated snare reverb).

More subtle effects can be achieved by choosing the Wet Pre target, where the gating is applied before (pre) the actual reverb processing. This is useful when you want the gating/ducking to be less obvious (ex. smoothly increasing/decreasing the reverb volume as a vocalist sings louder).

Gate Sidechain Source

Selects the source used to trigger the gate.

SourceBehavior
Int. (Internal)The dry signal is used to trigger the gate
Ext. (External)An external signal is used to trigger the gate

Next to Gate Sidechain Source is a small circular meter which shows the level of the sidechain signal.

Gate Sidechain Source / MeterGate Sidechain Source / Meter

To route to Megaverb’s external sidechain input, use the host/DAW’s built-in sidechain selection method.

In Ableton, sidechaining with a 3rd party plugin like Megaverb is different than with a native Ableton plugin. Here’s an Ableton tutorial with more details.

Using an external Gate Sidechain Source really opens up Megaverb’s creative possibilities. You can use an external source to control the reverb of another instrument, making it possible to achieve interesting ducking and gating effects and create interdependent relationships between different mix elements.

Gate Sidechain Listen

Gate Sidechain Listen allows you to monitor (listen to) the sidechain signal that is used to trigger the gate.

Gate Sidechain Listen is useful for making sure that the Gate Sidechain Source is correctly routed and for fine-tuning the triggering.

Gate Sidechain Listen has a small circular meter which shows the level of the sidechain signal.

Gate Sidechain Listen / MeterGate Sidechain Listen / Meter

  • Min Off
  • Max On

Specs

Supported Channel Configurations

Input Channel # Output Channel #
1 1
1 2
2 2

Presets

The presets are a great way to get to know each plugin. The preset drawer can be accessed at the bottom of each plugin by clicking the current preset name.

Acknowledgements

  • Jake Birch
  • Chris Conover
  • System of a Down
  • Tyler Duncan
  • Annlie Huang
  • TaeHo Park
  • Diana Zheng

About Goodhertz Plugins

User Interface

Goodhertz plugins are made to be workhorse tools that sound amazing. We’ve put a lot of thought and care into the audio quality and plugin usability, and for that reason, we’ve opted for simple and direct controls & interfaces that don’t rely on photorealistic knobs or ornamental screw heads to communicate their meaning.

We’ve also decided to only include meters and graphs when we feel they will directly lead to a better sonic result. Meters/graphs can consume significant CPU resources, and we firmly believe that if it sounds good, it is good.

Our meters can be manually enabled or disabled via the “Enable Metering” User Preference.

Keyboard Shortcuts

ActionKeyboard Shortcut
Enter New Parameter ValueOnce you’re tapped or double-tapped a control, type in a value, then hit Enter, Return, or Tab
Increment Parameter Value or arrow keys
Decrement Parameter Value or arrow keys
Jump to Next ParameterTab
Jump to Previous ParameterShift + Tab or ` (backtick)
Escape Parameter Focus / Close any Open DrawersEsc
Toggle A/BA (N.B. For this to work, you must have a control selected.)
Shift A to B / Shift B to AShift + A — this “shifts” the current settings to the opposite A/B state; i.e. if you’re on the A state, hitting Shift+A will copy those settings to the B state. (N.B. For this to work, you must have a control selected.)

Right-Click Actions

ActionInstruction
Reset Control to DefaultRight-Click & select “Reset [control] to Default”
Read about Control in ManualRight-Click & select “Read about [control]”
Lock a control when Switching PresetsRight-Click & select “Lock [control] When Switching Presets”
Copy all current plugin settingsRight-Click & select “Copy all settings as URL to Clipboard”
Paste all plugin settingsRight-Click & select “Paste all settings from Clipboard”
Reset all plugin settings to defaultRight-Click & select “Reset all settings to default”
Go to the plugin’s product pageRight-Click & select “Goodhertz [plugin name]”

Right-Click Preferences

ActionExplanation
Always Open Advanced PaneBy default, this is false — i.e. when the plugins open, they do not show you the advanced controls available by hitting the ••• button in the sidebar. If you’d like to always see the advanced controls, enable this preference.
Enable MeteringBy default, this is true — i.e. in normal operation, all audio meters and visualizations available in Goodhertz plugins are enabled and running. If you’d like to turn them off and disable all metering and visualization, deselect this option. And to turn them back on, simply reselect it. N.B. If you’re struggling to use a large number of Goodhertz plugins on an older processor with an integrated GPU, sometimes disabling metering can help.
Enable Scroll InputBy default, all Goodhertz sliders can be scrolled in addition to dragged. If you find this behavior unnecessary, deselect this option and no scrolling events will be used to control Goodhertz sliders.
Window SizeEnlarge or shrink the Goodhertz plugin window by selecting an option here. This will save your preference for all instances of this plugin.

Mouse Modifiers

ActionCombination (Mac)Combination (Windows)
Reset Parameter to Default ValueOption + ClickAlt + Click
Move Control with Coarse PrecisionShift + DragShift + Drag
Move Control with Fine PrecisionCommand + DragCtrl + Drag
Move Control with Normal PrecisionDragDrag

Automation

Unintentional digital clicks and pops are the worst. They happen for lots of reasons and often end up wasting time with needless revisions or mastering surgery. When they go unnoticed, they can make their way onto commercial albums and releases.

Plugin automation is a common cause of clicks and pops. Sweeping an EQ band, changing a delay setting, and even automating a plugin bypass can cause digital artifacts if poorly handled.

This is not true for Goodhertz plugins. Any parameter in a Goodhertz plugin, even on/off switches, can be automated freely and smoothly without clicks, pops, or zipper noises (unless otherwise noted). You can push them, pull them, LFO them — whatever you do, they’ll handle it gracefully.

Since our Master On/Off controls won’t create artifacts, we recommend that you use them rather than your DAW-supplied plugin bypass if you want to disable plugin processing.

Plugin Settings

Goodhertz plugin settings can be copied and pasted as text urls, which look like this: https://goodhertz.co/vulf-comp/3.0.9?cm=0&wf=0&lf=100&lfc=50

To copy and paste, right click anywhere on the plugin interface and select either the copy or the paste option.

E.g. If you paste “https://goodhertz.co/vulf-comp/3.0.9?cm=0&wf=0&lf=100&lfc=50” into Vulf Compressor it will recall the settings associated with that url. This way you can easily send an exact plugin setting to someone — in an email or even a tweet — without any guesswork or screenshots.

System Requirements

Mac OS X ≥ 10.9

Audio Unit 64-Bit, VST 64-Bit, VST3 64-Bit, or AAX 64-Bit host

Windows ≥ 7

VST 64-Bit, VST3 64-Bit, or AAX 64-Bit host

Contact Support

To send plugin feedback, please e-mail us at feedback@goodhertz.com.

If you have a quick question, send us a tweet @Goodhertz. We’re often able to respond faster to tweets than emails.

If you’re having trouble, experiencing a technical issue, or you think you’ve found a bug, please email support@goodhertz.com.

Find all our contact info & bug-reporting protocol on the contact page.